0139
   INTEGRATOR  
Scientific and MathematicalPrevious instrumentNext instrument

  Surveying Instrument Collection 

Maker

Stanley, Great Turnstile, London

Model

N/A

Serial Number

667

Dimensions

Length 630mm, Width 482mm, Height 110mm (dimensions of box) 

Image

Integrator

Description

This instrument is a mechanical Integrator with a brass frame and is an instrument for measuring the statical moments. The instrument is manually guided around the perimeter of the area to be determined. It is unusually large with four integrating wheels (three of them marked as 'P', 'M' and 'J').

According to Ken Dorsman (17 June 2002) there should be a rail in the box on which the two rollers travel and two extension arms to set the correct distance from the axis to be integrated. One integrating wheel records the area, a second the moment and a third the moment of inertia.

History & comments

Good descriptions of integrators as used in naval engineering can be found in:

Rossell, H.E. & L. B. Chapman (eds.) Principles of Naval Architecture, Vol.1, The Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers, New York, 1942, pp. 20-25.

Comstock, J. P. (ed) 1967. Principles of Naval Architecture. Revised ed. The Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers, New York, pp. 18-19, 64-68

Conservation

In original Mahogany box

Condition

Brass frame slightly scratched and steel wheels are rusty

Remarks
  • Two extension bars are provided with the instrument
  • Inscription: 'Stanley, Great Turnstile, Holborn, London'
  • Box refurbished and varnished in 1997 by A. Edmunds (Geomatic Engineering Storeman)
  • Donation received through Dr. A. J. Robinson
  • Thanks to Stephen Johnston of the Museum of the History of Science (Oxford) for pointing out (on 3 January 2001) the error in the initial classification (as planimeter).
  • Thanks to Ken Dorsman for his explanations and note (of 17 June 2002) on the erroneous clasification.
  • Thanks to Dave Thompson for pointing out (on 10 July 2004) the error in the initial classification (as planimeter).
  • Thanks to Bryan Chapman (21 January 2005) for providing the references above and for pointing out the error in the initial classification.
  • Catalogued by T. Ko and J. M. RŁeger
  • Updated by F. Pall & J. M. Rüeger(2005)

Dates

Manufactured in 1890 (approx). Catalogued in 1997

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